Jump to:  ENERGY  FOOD  LANDSCAPE  TRANSPORTATION  WASTE  WATER

 

 ENERGY

RESIDENTS CAN:

Hartford resident JUSTIN RODRIGUEZ wraps hot water pipes as part of a home energy efficiency assessment. He recently graduated from the weatherization program of Capital Community College, which trains residents like Justin for jobs in the green economy.
  • Get a no-cost or low-cost home energy audit through the Energize CT Home Energy Solutions Program
  • Finance renewable energy for your home through the CT Green Bank
  • Obtain a below-market loan for energy conservation improvements through the Connecticut Housing Investment Fund’s 1-4 family or 5+ family programs
  • Encourage your K-12 school to participate in the eesmarts energy education program
  • Put solar on your home through one of two CT Green Bank-sponsored programs:
  • SolarizeCT:  a bulk discount to purchase solar energy from the City’s competitively chosen provider – ending 9/14/17
  • “Solar for All”: a no-credit-check option for residents to lease solar energy from the CT Green Bank’s chosen provider
  • … or consider other solar solutions for your home
  • Switch your light bulbs to LED lighting by participating in one of the City’s light bulb swaps

BUSINESS OWNERS CAN:

PAUL BREGLIO, President of Crest Mechanical, used financing from the CT Green Bank’s C-PACE program to jumpstart energy efficiency projects in his 34,500 square foot building. He expects to save more than $400,000 over the next twenty years. Now that’s good business sense.

 FOOD

RESIDENTS CAN:

Urban farmer SALVADOR CASALES grows produce in Hartford, including an extensive selection of peppers. Salvador got started with help from Knox, an organization overseeing 20 community gardens.

BUSINESS OWNERS CAN:

JENIFFER PEREZ CARABALLO manages the SNAP program at the farmers’ market of Billings Forge Community Works, which doubles or triples SNAP benefits for produce purchases.

 LANDSCAPE

RESIDENTS CAN:

Hartford’s “Tree Lady,” CHARMAINE CRAIG, celebrates the revitalization of a North End garden. Influenced by a childhood spent on her grandfather’s farm, Charmaine has spent decades improving access to healthy trees and food. She continues to serve as a commissioner on the City’s Tree Commission.

BUSINESS OWNERS CAN:

Volunteer teams from THE HARTFORD renew the landscape at the corner of Homestead Avenue and Garden Street. Employees from The Hartford and other local companies make a big difference helping to keep our city green through clean-up days like this one, organized by Knox, as well as philanthropic support for worthy programs.

 TRANSPORTATION

RESIDENTS CAN:

DWIGHT TEAL estimates that, along with his teacher Peter, he has repaired more than 1,000 bikes for local residents as Catholic Worker’s primary bike repairperson at 18 Clark Street. Dwight, who biked to classes at Manchester Community College from North Hartford, is a dedicated cyclist and local artist.

BUSINESS OWNERS CAN:

Bike to Work Day is an annual ritual for TRAVELERS, which is a Bronze-level Bike Friendly Business (League of American Bicyclists). The company’s downtown headquarters boasts showers, changing rooms, and racks, and employees participate in a Cycling Network. Roughly 25% of employees take the bus to work. Still others carpool.
  • Consult this guide for greening your business
  • Provide locker rooms/changing facilities on site to encourage bike commuting among employees or residents (and note that Downtown Hartford YMCA makes shower facilities available to bike commuters)
  • Update your fleet of vehicles with low carbon electric or hybrid models and provide electric vehicle charging stations on-site
  • Encourage employees to take advantage of Park & Ride services
  • Consider designating an employee transportation coordinator (which does not necessarily require the creation of a new position)
  • Offer commuter benefits to your employees and potentially receive national recognition on the list of “Best Workplaces for Commuters
  • Consult this Transportation To Work Toolkit
  • Note the minimized car parking requirements and increased bicycle parking requirements in Hartford’s updated zoning code

 WASTE

RESIDENTS CAN:

Young Hartford residents participating in the Youth Service Corps learn basic carpentry skills and transform wood formerly bound for the landfill into useful products like benches, thanks to HERB VIRGO (at left) and the Keney Park Sustainability Project.

BUSINESS OWNERS CAN:

Members of BLUE EARTH COMPOST bring their portable (and educational) trash sorting apparatus to a North End community event. A recent recipient of grants to expand composting in Hartford, they have made a business of offering pick-up composting services to both residents and businesses around the city.

 WATER

RESIDENTS CAN:

An UNIDENTIFIED MAN fishes the Connecticut River, just north of Charter Oak Landing. Many Hartford residents take advantage of improved water quality and fish for sustenance or recreation. Programs like an annual “Cops and Bobbers” event with the Hartford Police and Fire Departments, broaden interest in clean waterways.

BUSINESS OWNERS CAN:

KIMBERLY KELLY, horticulturalist at the Connecticut Science Center, maintains the rooftop garden and green roof. The 154,000 square foot building, which is LEEDcertified, is energy efficient, and also limits excess water consumption. The roof, with its native plantings, stays cooler in the summer and requires 50% less water for maintenance.
  • Consult this this guide on landscaping and lawn care
  • Save water, energy, and operating costs with these resources
  • Use this guide to water conservation
  • Use DEEP’s guide for greening your business
  • Sponsor Riverfront Recapture, including programs such as Fourth of July fireworks that bring many to enjoy the Connecticut River
  • Encourage employees to develop a team for the city’s annual Dragon Boat Race